Thoughtful modern day “Plagues” to contemplate this Passover – presented by JACPAC – but there is something missing

April 14, 2014 2 comments

JACPAC (the Joint Action Committee for Political Affairs) a wonderful group of politically active women (and a few men) whose issues center around Israel, women’s rights aWe were once slaves in the land of Egyptnd now, gun control, have come out with a list of ten modern day plagues to think about this Pesach [Their list follows at the bottom of this post - unfortunately, I couldn't get the very cool green frog background to copy over].  Their hope is that:

As you gather with your families around the seder table and retell the story of Passover, remember that oppression, hunger, discrimination and violence still plague us all.

However, I thought that given their goal, they left out two of the most important things that we Jews should be thinking about.  So, I wrote them the following:

To Marcia, Dana, Janna and JACPAC:

With respect, I believe that you have left out two extremely important plagues:

-          The Occupation and the treatment of the Palestinians

-          Failure to reach a two state solution

The occupation is one of the most important plagues because of the threat it presents to Israel remaining both a Jewish and Democratic state.  It also tends to corrupt a society. I have witnessed this personally when visiting the West Bank and I assume that you have as well.  The attitude towards the Palestinians is simply shameful.  And it is clearly appears to be an overall policy of the government and military.  If this were happening in the US, I am sure that JACPAC would be the first to speak out against it.

For myself, one of the most important aspects of the Seder is the fact that the Haggadah emphasizes the fact that “you” – the Seder participant him/herself – were a slave in the land of Egypt.  I think that this is profound.  The Haggadah is asking each of us to put ourselves in the shoes of someone that is enslaved and oppressed.  It wants us to feel what it is like to be the one who is powerless – as we Jews have been for 2000 years until quite recently.

Now however, the miracle of the success of the State of Israel has put us in an unfamiliar position.  The Jewish State (we shouldn’t need the Palestinians to have to bless this description) is now in control of the West Bank and controls access to Gaza.  Whether you want to call it” occupation” or not (a la Sheldon Adelson), Israel is controlling the lives of 2.5 million people in the West Bank.  How we as Jews handle this situation is a test of Jewish values. The lesson I take from the Haggadah is to remember what it is like to be powerless and oppressed – and if the tables are turned so that Jews are in power, to use that power wisely.

And, I believe that “Treatment of the Palestinians” should come ahead of “BDS” – because there is a connection.  BDS scares many of us precisely because we have seen the effectiveness of this tactic before particularly with South Africa.  As a matter of fact, many of us Jews were in the forefront of the BDS movement against South Africa.  While some of those who promote BDS have the goal of destroying the state of Israel, there are many others who are simply protesting the very real abuses of power and justice that do occur.

The question I would like to contemplate for this Pesach is this:  If we keep the land, but lose our ethics, where are we?

I think the Haggadah is telling us that that puts us back wandering in a moral desert.

_______________________________

So, yasher koach, on the list of plagues.  It provides much for all of us to consider at the Seder table.  I simply wish that you would challenge your membership even further.  There are very real facts on the ground in Israel that are hard to look at.  But, hiding our heads in the sand, doesn’t change the reality on the ground.

Best wishes to you and your families for a chag kasher v’sameach — a meaningful and sweet Pesach.

 

JACPAC’s Email:

You thought the plagues ended with Pharaoh? 
Think Again 

Today’s Plagues

 

1.  Iran and Nuclear Weapons

Israel’s security hangs in the balance as Iran races to build up their nuclear stockpile.

 

2. Boycott. Divestment. Sanctions (BDS)

Israel will be economically, culturally and educationally strangled from a global BDS movement.

3.  Global Warming

Climate change will lead to rising global temperatures, severe natural disasters, and dangerous levels of pollution.

 

4.  Gun Violence

In America, an adult is killed by a firearm every 17 minutes and a child every 3.25 hours.

5.  Limited Access to Reproductive Rights

Increased restrictions: forcing abortion clinics to close at a record pace, mandatory ultrasounds, loss of contraception insurance coverage, 6-week abortion bans

 

6.  Theology vs. Science

State lawmakers across the country are pushing for creationism to be taught in schools instead of the science of evolution.  A Senate candidate from North Carolina has even said that the big bang theory are “lies from the pit of hell.”

7.  Erosion of Separation of Church and State

Lawmakers in SC, VA and TN are debating bills that will put prayer back in schools.

 

8. Voting Rights Suppression

Over 30 states across the country have considered discriminatory laws to make it harder for minorities, seniors and students to exercise their right to vote.

9.  Hunger

Today 49 million people in the U.S. struggle to put food on the table. This year the Senate voted to cut $8.6 billion from the federal food assistance program (SNAP) over the next several years.

10.  Human Trafficking

This is a form of modern day slavery.  In the U.S., between 100,000-300,000 children are used for the purpose of sexual exploitation yearly.

____________________________________

 

As you gather with your families around the seder table and retell the story of Passover, remember that oppression, hunger, discrimination and violence still plague us all. 

 

This Passover, let’s recommit ourselves to making our world better for all and fulfill the promises of our own Jewish heritage and traditions.

 

_____________________________________ 
sources: CDC, JCPA, Brady Campaign, Feeding America, ACLU, Children’s Defense Fund

 

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Pity Norman Podhoretz: He ignores the real issue in his recent WSJ op-ed

April 14, 2014 Leave a comment

A good friend, Dan Sabol, President of the Chicago Chapter of the American-Israel Chamber of Commerce, asked me to comment on Podhoretz’ recent op-ed in the Wall Street Journal,  Pity the Palestinians? Count Me Out found here:  http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304640104579487444112949138?mg=reno64-wsj   In the piece, Podohoretz excoriates the Palestinians with gleeful delight – but fails to address the real issues.  Here is what I wrote to Dan:

 

This op-ed is pure, unadulterated tripe.  Mr. Podhoretz is known for his Israel right-or-wrong viewpoint, which he promotes vociferously and acrimoniously via Commentary.

He shows his bias from the very first paragraph when he labels John Kerry’s diplomacy as “farcical”.

Provoked by the predictable collapse of the farcical negotiations forced by Secretary of State John Kerry on the Palestinians and the Israelis, I wish to make a confession: I have no sympathy—none—for the Palestinians. Furthermore, I do not believe they deserve any.

I agree that many did predict that the talks would collapse – so therefore the failure was “predictable”.  And even more, probably most, while not “predicting collapse”, gave the chance of success as low.  But certainly folks said the same thing about George Mitchell in Ireland.  As Mitchell so famously said:  “We had 700 days of failure and one day of success”.  By inference, I assume that Mr. Podhoretz also found Mitchell’s work in Ireland to be farcical as well.

Further, in virtually every paragraph he says something that is either factually incorrect, incomplete or biased in interpretation. [Which I don’t have the time nor desire to go into here – but certainly can]

All this is fine.  But there are two things that aren’t.

First, his attitude, which is gleefully acrimonious, tendentious and supercilious.

But my biggest issue with this article is that he does not really address the problem.  I, too, have no sympathy for the Palestinians that want to destroy Israel and even less (I don’t know if you can have less than no sympathy, but I do) for those who want to kill all of the Jews.  But what Mr. Podhoretz does not address is that while blaming the Palestinians might make us fell righteous and good, the occupation is really our problem – no matter what the Palestinians do.  Nor is how other Arab states treat the Palestinians or their citizens relevant to our problem.  As a Jew, what I care about is how Jews treat other people.  I believe we Jews choose to hold ourselves to Jewish values – higher values.  The Occupation endangers Israel remaining both a Jewish and democratic state.  That is our problem as Jews.  We need to find a creative way to end it.

No water in East Jerusalem for two weeks. Yet Israel claims that ALL of Jerusalem s/b the capital

March 27, 2014 Comments off

25 Days Without WaterOne of the main stumbling blocks to coming to a peace agreement with the Palestinians is Jerusalem.  The Israelis claim the entire city of Jerusalem (as they define it – including the annexation of East Jerusalem in 1980) as Israel’s capital.  The Palestinians also demand Jerusalem (Al-Quds) as their capital – although it seems that they might accept East Jerusalem and the holy sites as sufficient.

A recent post in +972, tells about an East Jerusalem neighborhood that has been without water for three weeks:

The East Jerusalem neighborhoods of Ras Shehada, Ras Khamis, Dahyat A’salam and the Shuafat refugee camp, which are cut off from the rest of the city by the separation wall, have gone without running water since March 4.

And further:

Palestinian East Jerusalem residents turned to Israel’s High Court on Tuesday demanding that running water be restored to their homes, after suffering for three weeks without it. The petition was filed on their behalf by the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI).

So this raises a question:  If the municipal authority of Jerusalem does not systematically offer the same services to East Jerusalem as it does to the rest of Jerusalem, how can it claim that it is all part of the same city?  In the U.S. there is a law that if you don’t retain some aspects of private ownership over a piece of property, it falls into the public domain.  You may notice this via plaques on ground of certain building setbacks or even closing off of small areas of public walkways that exist on private property for some hours or a day to maintain private rights.  So, isn’t the current situation in Jerusalem somewhat analogous?  That is, if basic municipal services are not being systematically provided, or like in this case, repairs are not made within a reasonable time, doesn’t that provide an argument that, in fact, the municipality has given up some right to claim these neighborhoods as part of its city?

More photos here:  PHOTOS: 13 days without water in East Jerusalem

 

“We’re living in an age of mass uprisings” – Interviewer of filmaker Jehane Neujahim (“The Square”) points out something being missed by MSM and most Americans

March 22, 2014 1 comment

Jehane Noujaim filming The Square. (Courtesty of Noujaim Films)“The Square” is an Oscar nominated real-time documentary about Tahrir Square.  It’s well worth reading her perspective on events in Egypt and her filmmaking in this interview by Ed Rampell in In These Times:  “The Revolution Will Be Filmed”.  When one goes beyond Flight 370 and the Kardashians, it is clear that skyrocketing inequality of wealth and human rights is leading to a period of global unrest that is rarely commented on in the U.S.  It is a good thing that America has football and March Madness, or we might be seeing similar protests here.

Here is the quote that quote my attention:

We’re living in an age of mass uprisings. Every day there seems to be another protest—such as those in Bosnia, Venezuela or Ukraine. What do you make of these mass revolts?

Young people are trying to change their relationship with their government. It’s this exciting time when they’re using a public space as a political tool for change.

Categories: Middle East Tags: ,

To Any of You Going to the AIPAC Policy Conference – Please Send Me a Report

February 27, 2014 1 comment

I know that you will have an exciting time with lots of energy and hoopla.  But I am very curious to hear about the tone and content of what transpires.AIPAC Policy Conference

First, I would like to know whether Kerry’s diplomatic push is spoken of in a positive or negative manner.  That is, whether U.S. getting the sides to the table is a good thing or not – NOT whether the chances of success are good.  Not whether there is no partner, etc.  That is, does AIPAC support diplomacy with regard to the Palestinians?

I am interested to hear how much support you hear for a two state solution.  Again, not whether or not it is likely to come about right now – but whether it is a good idea or not that trying our hardest to work towards  that goal or not.  In that regard, do you hear anyone talking about the importance of coming up with some solution to the current Occupation?  Do people think that the status quo can continue indefinitely?  Or, annexation of Judea and Samaria into one Jewish state where the Palestinians have less rights than Jews?  Annexation of Judea and Samaria where it’s one person, one vote? Or, again, Do you hear anyone talking about creative solutions, like saying that it might be a good idea to freeze construction in the West Bank temporarily to see whether this might force the Palestinians to ‘put up or shut up’?

Do you hear anyone talking about very real everyday facts on the ground in the West Bank?  Like in East Jerusalem that Palestinians are being forced from their homes and replaced by Jews?  Or, about Settler violence (so called “price tag” attacks) including burning of olive trees, torching of mosques, and even firing guns at Palestinians by both settlers and even IDF – with almost no legal recourse?  Or the destruction of Bedouin structures (as flimsy as they may be) that are on their own land?  These are facts which are written about in Israeli papers that should be discussed here as well.  In the same way that the rocket firings from Gaza, or the buildup in arms by Hezbollah, or the fact that Hamas is going broke need to be discussed.  (One excellent thing is there isn’t much to discuss about violence from the West Bank against Israelis because as I understand it, in the last two years, thank God, there has only been one killing of a Jew by an Arab from the West Bank.  That is one too many – but frankly if you look into it, I believe that you will find that it is less than the number of Palestinians that have been killed by settlers and IDF during that same time period.)

Next, I am curious to know whether you hear support for diplomacy with Iran – and what the nature of the agreement is that they would support.  I personally am a big supporter of keeping the military option on the table – but even more importantly, I believe that we need to push very hard to make this diplomatic effort work.  Public criticism of the administration makes very little sense given that we are in negotiations at the moment.  Doesn’t this type of rift show weakness, not strength?  Although AIPAC finally backed off pushing the Senate Sanctions bill when the Republicans tried to force a vote (and they are still trying to force a vote by attaching the language to other bills), they essentially ignored Kerry’s specific call during Senate hearings for them to hold off on this bill until the talks had run their course.  If sanctions were supposed to force the Iranians to the bargaining table, then they worked.  It is time to support the negotiations and the negotiators.  While I have heard the argument that the Senate sanctions bill will provide more leverage, that is not the Administration’s position.  The move in the Senate appears to be more grandstanding than anything else – and particularly now that the Republicans are moving to call a vote.  Wouldn’t it be more effective to work behind the scenes to make sure that the Administration drives a hard bargain?

Also, I would like to hear about the diplomatic proposals that are being discussed.  Although it would best if Iran dismantled their entire program – no enrichment, no centrifuges, no missiles – realistically, they will never agree to this.  It would be too much of a loss of face for them both internationally and domestically.  Therefore, be aware that anyone proposing no enrichment is not seriously supporting a diplomatic agreement.  They aren’t necessarily warmongers – but many do in fact know that the Iranians will never accept this, but it is their way of “supporting” diplomacy while knowing that their position has no chance of acceptance.  Listen carefully to people.   Some will say that Iran must be prevented from getting a nuclear Others will say that it must be prevented from having a nuclear capability.  This is a significant difference and you should listen closely for who says which.  If they say capability, they are usually also saying that Iran must eliminate their entire nuclear program – which as I said above is totally unrealistic.

I am particularly interested to know how much talk there is about the consequences of possible military action – and what the speakers say about it.  I haven’t seen the agenda, but I believe that there may indeed be some experts discussing this and I would be interested to know what their assessments are.

Finally, a little prognostication on my part.  My bet is that every Congressman and Senator will say the following:

“Israel is our greatest ally”

“Israel shares our values”

“Iran is the greatest threat to Israel, the US and the entire world”

“Iran is the greatest supporter of terrorism in the world”  [What ever happened to Al Qaeda?]

“The military option must not be taken off the table”  [A very true statement – but how many folks are willing to talk about the exact make up of the military action – and what the resulting risks and consequences might be.  Are folks willing to risk Hezbollah raining down hundreds or thousands of rockets on Israel?  The question needs to be discussed]

“Israel’s security is our number one priority”

“I love Israel [more than the next guy]”

Don’t get me wrong, these are all good things.  Most of these are true statements.  However, the answers are so pat, that they border on pandering – and most important, it is not good if this is the level of sophistication with which these people are going to be basing their votes on when it comes to legislation that has such serious consequences for the US, Israel and the entire world.

Looking forward to hearing about the Conference.  Have a great trip and enjoy!

If You Want to Handicap the Vote on Military Action Against Syria Here’s A Great Website

September 5, 2013 Comments off

Think ProgessLiberal website, ThinkProgress, is tracking likely Yes and No votes here:  Syria Vote

Categories: Israel

Alternative Response in Syria: A Humanitarian Strike

September 4, 2013 Comments off

DOD Support For Disaster ReliefAs time goes on, the whole issue of an international military response to Syria’s use of chemical weapons becomes tied in a tighter and tighter Gordian knot. Tactically, the military options themselves offer less and less chance for effectiveness as the Syrians prepare themselves both operationally and mentally for an attack.  Strategically, the extent and depth of the response is being weighed by the forces of geopolitics: particularly the Russians and Iranians.  Not to mention our allies, the Israelis.  The international justice framework has shown its typical weakness.  Not only has the U.N. refused to sanction military action, but a coalition of the “willing” outside of the U.N. is pretty minimal, particularly after the British Parliament voted nay. France and Turkey seem to be the only major players willing to support action by the U.S.  Then, there is American politics.  Had Obama not decided to seek Congressional approval, he would have been hounded by Republicans for overreaching his executive powers; now that he has decided to go to Congress, he will presumably be accused of weakening executive powers for the future.  Not only that, he is also being labeled as indecisive, weak and giving the enemy too much time.  And, finally, there are the unintended consequences of a military strike.  No one can predict with certainty what the reactions of the Syrians, the Russians or Iranians might be. Although many are betting that the Syrians will not react in any major way – one never really knows.  Although one of the Administration’s major goals is to keep “boots off the ground”, once the first American missile is fired, events will take on lives of their own. So, the fact is that taking military action is essentially a no-win proposition.

There is, however, an alternative:  the U.S. could launch a humanitarian strike.  Instead, of launching a couple of cruise missiles, the U.S. could  launch ships, cargo planes and helicopters full of food, medical supplies, building material, blankets, clothes, etc to the refugee camps.  It was just announced yesterday that the number of Syrian refugees has passed the 2 million mark.  Our assistance would presumably be extremely welcome by Jordan and somewhat welcome by Turkey and possibly Iraq.  Granted, this is putting boots on the ground, but the U.S. actually does this all of the time.  Every year both USAID and the Department of Defense respond to scores of international disasters all around the world.  Some of the past disaster response efforts with which the U.S. military has assisted include the 2004 tsunami in Southeast Asia; 2005 earthquake and 2010 flooding in Pakistan;  and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.  So, while we constantly provide aid and assistance, it is rarely done with such a great potential strategic benefit.

Doesn’t this make a much stronger statement about the use of chemical weapons, than taking mostly symbolic destructive military action? Instead of assuming that the only language the world understands is force, let’s make “the shot across the bow” be helping tens of thousands of innocent people.

However, some have said that if the U.S. doesn’t respond militarily, it will show a lack of resolve.  But there are different types of resolve, and coming to the aid of the victims of this war seems to be an excellent one.  Certainly, there will be unintended consequences of this action – but for a change many of them may actually be positive!  We can take the moral high ground and build respect within the international community.  We can ask the international community to join us, with particular emphasis on the Russians and the Iranians.  They would be hard put to refuse and if they were to engage in this project perhaps it would actually improve the chances for negotiations and diplomacy in both Syria and Iraq.  In turn, humanitarian action would enhance our ability to gain support from other nations and the U.N. if the situation deteriorates, and we really do need to build a coalition for military action.  It might also have the effect of putting some pressure on both the Iranians and the Russians to change their position on supporting Assad and continuing the violence.

Finally, one of the main advantages of a humanitarian strike is that it totally resets the strategic and tactical calculus.  As has been said a hundred different ways by a hundred different commentators, the current situation that Obama is in appears to be absolutely no-win – both from a domestic political standpoint and from an international perspective.  Therefore, it is time to create a new option.  Providing a huge level of humanitarian aid to the refugees sends the right message to all of the parties – and it slices the Gordian knot in half.

 

Categories: Israel
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